Our blog

How does a tooth decay?

March 26th, 2019

When acids are allowed to erode tooth enamel long enough to leach calcium and other minerals from your enamel and dentin, a process called demineralization occurs. This rapidly leads to tooth decay unless reversed by good oral hygiene and professional dental cleanings at our Eau Claire, WI office. Acids responsible for tooth decay come from the wastes of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli bacteria that thrive in dental plaque, a substance that is the leading cause of periodontitis.

Where do demineralizing acids come from?

Dietary sugars comprise the bulk of tooth-decaying acids, including table sugar, cooked starches, fructose, glucose, and lactose. In fact, as soon as you bite down on a sugary cookie or into a French fry, bacteria start digesting sugars, breaking them down and eventually excreting them as demineralizing acids. As this bacteria colony grows and becomes organized, plaque develops and forms that tough, yellowish coating you often see on the tops of teeth at the gumline.

Plaque is the Problem

Dental plaque is a filmy type of nesting place for bacteria that also keeps acids pressed against tooth enamel. Since plaque cannot be removed by brushing, it is important that a person who suffers tooth decay visit Menomonie Street Dental immediately so we can use special tools to scrape and thoroughly clean teeth.

Signs of Tooth Decay

Early tooth decay and cavities remain asymptomatic until demineralization creates a hole deep enough to reach the tooth’s inner tissues and nerve endings. Eventually, tooth decay will cause tooth sensitivity, toothache, vague pain when biting down on the affected tooth, and possibly pus seeping around a tooth’s gum line if the decay creates an infection. If treatment is delayed long enough, a decaying tooth may loosen, crumble, and ultimately fall out, which leaves an empty or partially empty socket.

Preventing Tooth Decay

Getting regular checkups with Dr. Schulyer Van Gorden, Dr. Derek Rognlien, Dr. Kari Peper, Dr. Brittany Huiras, and Dr. Eric Carlson, brushing and flossing twice a day, and eating fruits or crunchy vegetables at snack time instead of a candy bar or doughnut are the three best ways to keep your teeth healthy, white, and where they should be: in your mouth.

Dental Emergencies in Children

March 19th, 2019

Unfortunately, dental emergencies can sometimes be unavoidable among young children. The good news is Dr. Schulyer Van Gorden, Dr. Derek Rognlien, Dr. Kari Peper, Dr. Brittany Huiras, and Dr. Eric Carlson can help you prepare in case you and your child find yourselves in any of the following situations.

Teething

Starting at about four months and lasting up to three years, your son or daughter may experience teething pain. It’s common for teething children to grow irritable and become prone to drooling due to tender gums. Give your child a cold teething ring or rub his or her gums with your finger to help relieve the discomfort.

Loss of Teeth

If a baby tooth is knocked out in an accident, bring your child to our Eau Claire, WI office to make sure damage hasn’t occurred in the mouth. Permanent teeth can sometimes grow in before baby teeth have fallen out. In this situation, Dr. Schulyer Van Gorden, Dr. Derek Rognlien, Dr. Kari Peper, Dr. Brittany Huiras, and Dr. Eric Carlson should examine your child to make sure teeth are growing in properly. This can prevent serious issues from arising later in adulthood.

Gum Issues

Bleeding gums could mean several things. They may be an early sign of periodontal disease, which results from poor oral hygiene. Gums may also bleed if a youngster is brushing too hard or has suffered an injury to the gum tissue.

Rinse your child’s mouth with warm salt water and apply pressure to the area if bleeding continues. Don’t hesitate to contact our Eau Claire, WI office if you are concerned so we can schedule an appointment.

As a parent, you can provide the best education for your children on proper oral hygiene habits. If you some coaching, ask Dr. Schulyer Van Gorden, Dr. Derek Rognlien, Dr. Kari Peper, Dr. Brittany Huiras, and Dr. Eric Carlson for tips during your next appointment.

Menomonie Street Dental is looking to the future

March 18th, 2019

Since 1974, Menomonie Street Dental has been providing the residents of Eau Claire and the Chippewa Valley with the best dental service around. The practice is excited to be entering its next phase of development.  Facilities are being upgraded with the goal of creating a state of the art dental office that will increase convenience and accessibility for its patients.

The work for this ambitious project has begun and the dental office will remain fully operational throughout the remodel process. Treatment rooms are being designed, all equipment is being upgraded to keep in step with the most advanced dental techniques, and the creation of a new sterilization center will exceed industry standards.

The dentists and staff of Menomonie Street Dental are dedicated to providing patients and their families with the highest quality dental care.  They can’t wait to show their patients a transformed dental office that has been designed to meet the dental needs of patients and their family for many years to come. The interior/exterior renovation of Menomonie Street Dental is scheduled to be completed December of 2019.

 

 

Oral-Systemic Health

March 12th, 2019

Oral-systemic health is the idea that oral health is a critical and interconnected component to a patient’s overall health and well-being. Studies show that people who have poor oral health are more likely to have other health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, or a high likelihood of stroke.

Some of the data suggests that oral pathogens may trigger up to 50% of heart attacks, and that the oral bacteria P. gingivalis may cause a 13.6-fold increase in patients’ risk of a heart attack.

Still, the exact relationship between oral and overall health isn't fully known — whether one causes the other or how treating one might affect the other. But it should serve as a warning call to anyone suffering with poor oral health, especially periodontal disease.

More studies need to be conducted to establish the precise link between the two, but whatever it is, one thing is certain: good oral hygiene makes for good oral health. Many dentists and doctors realize the need to work together as a cohesive healthcare team to improve and maintain the health of their communities.

The American Dental Association says oral health is essential to overall health, and not just a luxury. They are setting goals to reduce the amount of tooth decay in low-income communities for both children and adults.

So what is a patient about this information regarding oral-systemic health? Here are some tips to increase and maintain your overall well-being:

  • Have an effective oral hygiene routine. Brush twice a day for two minutes each time, floss daily, clean your tongue, and avoid sugary beverages.
  • Visit your dentist regularly. Regular cleanings and checkups at your dentist’s office will keep your mouth clean and ensure you’re taking good care of it.
  • Eat a healthful diet. A diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and natural, unprocessed foods contributes to the overall health of your body.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of pure, clean water throughout the day. A good rule of thumb is to drink eight eight-ounce glasses a day.
  • Relax, destress. Stress can play a big role in all forms of disease. Take time during your day to relax, meditate, stretch, and allow your body and mind to rest.

If you have questions about your oral health and how it may be affecting your general health, feel free to ask Dr. Schulyer Van Gorden, Dr. Derek Rognlien, Dr. Kari Peper, Dr. Brittany Huiras, and Dr. Eric Carlson during your next visit to our Eau Claire, WI office.

15.00

best of the chipewa valley
Back to Top